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Old 01-28-2015, 03:38 AM View Post #1 (Link) Writing Styles: Creative vs. Academic 2
GeonamicWarrior (Offline)
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I have more questions that are similar to what I had in "Writing Styles: Creative vs. Academic," but I'd like this to be in its separate thread to ease the searching and explanations. Rules from that thread still apply here with being clear on whether it'd be best to use so-and-so in creative writing or academic writing. Certainty is also highly stressed as much as the above thread issued.

1. I've heard from my English teacher that "due to" is different than "because" on function in the middle of the sentence. It had something to do with "due to" meaning "caused by," but I'm still puzzled on how that's different than "because." She's really busy outside of class and during class when she's not teaching, so I haven't had the chance to ask her or any other English staff at my school for help on this. I already know the major difference when either is used at the beginning of a sentence, so you don't need to explain that if you don't want to.

2. With proper nouns, or nouns that are exact, such as names of specific people and places, when do you use "the" before addressing it? For example, even though "Aqua District" is an actual name for an area, I've heard of it with "the" right before as "Let's go to the Aqua District." However, states' names, which should be proper nouns, aren't the same way; they're not like, "Let's go to the New York." Why is that? Is that a style, set-in-stone grammar, or something that modernized with time, like how fast food is its own improper noun without needing a hyphen between?

3. When, why, and how do you use parentheses and brackets in both forms of writing? I'm sure it's more in academic, but I have seen it somewhat in creative writing before.

Thank you again, if you answered as well as read my questions! I appreciate it.
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Old 01-29-2015, 03:28 PM View Post #2 (Link)
lalodragon (Offline)
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Originally Posted by GeonamicWarrior View Post
2. With proper nouns, or nouns that are exact, such as names of specific people and places, when do you use "the" before addressing it? For example, even though "Aqua District" is an actual name for an area, I've heard of it with "the" right before as "Let's go to the Aqua District." However, states' names, which should be proper nouns, aren't the same way; they're not like, "Let's go to the New York." Why is that? Is that a style, set-in-stone grammar, or something that modernized with time, like how fast food is its own improper noun without needing a hyphen between?
I'm not entirely sure of the others, but this one I can do.

You could say "Let's go to Aqua District," because "Aqua District" is a proper noun. But suppose that it weren't an official name. Say that we call it "aqua district" casually, just because it's very blue. Then you would say "Let's go to the aqua district" as you would say "Let's go to the district" (not, "Let's go to district").

Basically, this happens when a proper name is formed of a modifier + an object that we usually preface with "the". You wouldn't say, "Let's go to the New York" any more than "Let's go to the York." But you would say "Let's go to the United States," as you'd say, "Let's go to the states" or "Let's go to that state."

This is an instinctive use, so it's not something that's taught, and it's not a hard-and-fast rule.... except when it is....You can say "Let's go to Aqua District," but if you say "Let's go to United States," it sounds awkward to a native English speaker. If you want to be 100% sure, I'd recommend this rule: If you'd say "Let's go to the x", then use "Let's go to the Red X" when it becomes a proper noun.
Still, this is all instinctive and colloquial. I'd say, "Let's go to the Union Street Diner", as in "Let's go to the diner," but not "Let's go to the Union Street"-- even though I might say, "Let's go to the street" or "that street."
  
						Last edited by lalodragon; 01-29-2015 at 03:30 PM.
					
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Old 05-07-2018, 12:46 PM View Post #3 (Link)
Deanajohnson (Offline)
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I hope this helps a little.
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