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Old 04-11-2015, 07:18 AM View Post #1 (Link) What make's you attatched to a character in a novel?
han123 (Offline)
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I've had a look through the forum and didn't see a post on this question, so I hope I didn't miss one but here goes.

I have started writing a novel (again, haha I always seem to give up and then start again) and I want my readers to feel attached to the characters so that when something sad or happy happens, they really feel for the reader and it has a big impact on them. The events that occur in the novel so far are mainly sad and one slightly scary (I hope), so I want to make it intense I guess. Not over the top, but intense.

Now that I have explained myself (sorry for the ranting ), here are my questions:

1) What makes you attached to a character?
2) What things would you generally find upsetting/sad?
3) Do you feel more attached if you have a rough idea of what the person looks like, or if like everything is described (Of course not in one paragraph, but just little things here and there)?
4) How do you stay motivated when typing past around chapter 5?

I would really appreciate some opinions and thankyou in advance , and please excuse my spelling in the title, I only just realised I got it wrong.
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Old 04-11-2015, 11:03 AM View Post #2 (Link)
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Originally Posted by han123 View Post
1) What makes you attached to a character?
I'd say that I feel attached to a character to whom I can relate. If a character is believable, you're half way there. In such a situation, there's a good chance I'll be attached to the character. What ensures that I get attached, is how the author goes about describing the character, his/her actions, etc.
Originally Posted by han123 View Post
2) What things would you generally find upsetting/sad?
From what I've read, it's usually when the characters (usually minor characters) face unexpected ends/deaths. But, you could have them face other predicaments, as well.
Originally Posted by han123 View Post
3) Do you feel more attached if you have a rough idea of what the person looks like, or if like everything is described (Of course not in one paragraph, but just little things here and there)?
I definitely wouldn't be attached to a character if all I know about the character is what he/she looks like. From my experience, I usually have a good idea about the character and his/her intentions, interactions and dialogues, before I start to get attached. In short, I feel if you spend some time developing the character, throughout the course of the book, you'll be able to get the readers more attached to the character.
Originally Posted by han123 View Post
4) How do you stay motivated when typing past around chapter 5?
That's a bit tough to answer; it might be different for different people. But, I feel that if the story is interesting to me and I really want to finish the story, then I automatically feel motivated to keep typing it.
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Old 04-11-2015, 03:51 PM View Post #3 (Link)
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Originally Posted by han123 View Post
1) What makes you attached to a character?
2) What things would you generally find upsetting/sad?
3) Do you feel more attached if you have a rough idea of what the person looks like, or if like everything is described (Of course not in one paragraph, but just little things here and there)?
4) How do you stay motivated when typing past around chapter 5?
1. Their humor, interesting personality, actions, monologue, and dialogue.
2. Death, two close friends/relatives/loved ones physically/verbally/emotionally fighting, slavery, and torture.
3. Appearances doesn't make a difference to me. I say actions speak louder than words.
4. Fitting music, seeing the characters have a future, and typing anytime I'm motivated because when I'm not motivated and I type, I tend to stop sooner.
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Old 04-11-2015, 06:09 PM View Post #4 (Link)
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1) What makes you attached to a character?

I can recognize them as human. I mean, they're not human, but they're quite similar. The more you can trick me, the more attached I become.

2) What things would you generally find upsetting/sad?

This is an unanswerable question, at least when it comes to specifics. There are plenty of things I find sad, but really, when it comes to storytelling, that all depends on the character. What do they want? What do they value? If they can't get what they want and they lose what they value, that upsets me as a reader.

3) Do you feel more attached if you have a rough idea of what the person looks like, or if like everything is described (Of course not in one paragraph, but just little things here and there)?

This depends. I usually don't care, but there have been times when I found it weird when a writer didn't describe his or her character. That probably has to do with how descriptive they are in general. If you describe a lot, it probably makes more sense to throw at least some character description in there. If you don't, I probably won't notice if you never describe your character.

4) How do you stay motivated when typing past around chapter 5?

I have to love the story, and I have to make myself write. Sometimes we lose motivation, and that's okay. Taking a little break is okay, too. But ultimately we have to make sure that novel gets written.

That said, we also need to have the clarity to know when it's not working and when it's best to discard the draft.
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Old 04-12-2015, 02:12 AM View Post #5 (Link)
han123 (Offline)
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Thankyou very much for your answers guys, I really appreciate it!!
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Old 04-12-2015, 02:41 AM View Post #6 (Link)
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1) What makes you attached to a character?

Anything. I agree with what everyone else has said. It's also about the details for me, too. Tiny little behaviors or running inside jokes or things. Perhaps they don't like ice cream, or they get bothered by an eyelash on someone's cheek, or they have to touch the fabric in the fancy clothes store even though they don't have enough money to buy anything. Just those bits of personality.

I love when I can relate to a character. If they have similar opinions or thought processes or drive or background to me, that makes it easier to become attached. If I spend a lot of time reading a well-developed character, I will most certainly become attached.

Also, sometimes I get attached to people by affiliation. There's already a character that I love, and I watch them love another character somehow, and it doesn't really matter if the secondary character is especially a good character, I'll love them because the main character does.

2) What things would you generally find upsetting/sad?

This depends on everything. I like Dabs' answer. I was watching a movie today in which throughout the entire thing was this girl trying to reach her mother. This girl is fierce and determined, and when she finally hugged her mother, there were tears.

Other things include moments when the character remembers something, or realizes something sad. In the book Invaded that I've just finished, a young, happy security guard jokes to the main character, "Looks like I'll be your new best friend!" Except he didn't realize his best friend had just died.

Death itself usually makes me angry first, rather than sad. I spend a good few minutes smacking the book on the table and shouting at my friends and such. What makes me sad about death in books is the after, when they're doing something and go "I've won, but so-and-so isn't here to see it" or "So-and-so would have liked that."

3) Do you feel more attached if you have a rough idea of what the person looks like, or if like everything is described (Of course not in one paragraph, but just little things here and there)?

Little things here and there is definitely my preference for description, but honestly I create my own images of characters anyway. I love descriptions of characters, and visualization is very important to me, but I don't need it to become attached. Those are unrelated ideas.

4) How do you stay motivated when typing past around chapter 5?

I don't have chapters in my long term work yet, but if I did, I would only have gotten past chapter 5 once. And that was because every idea at that point was new to me and I was watching my word count rise to exponentially high numbers. I could have probably kept that motivation up for a while except then all the plot-holes in my story collapsed on me and I had to try to figure out how to piece it back together.

Edit: also, finding a good friend to rant everything about your story to-- or perhaps just a little bit of it-- is also extremely motivational. My cousin cured one of my greatest plot-holes over Christmas and ideas were everywhere. Excitement and response fuels me when I write.
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Old 04-12-2015, 03:15 AM View Post #7 (Link)
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1) What makes you attached to a character?

When there is a real, three dimensional character, it's easy to get attached to him or her. I think that the reader should see all the flaws and positives of the character. The reader should see them at their best and worst. What makes you attached to an actual human? What makes you develop feelings for an actual human? The same applies to a character, I feel.

2) What things would you generally find upsetting/sad?

I think anyone can relate to a tragic event for a character in a story in one way or another. Obviously, death and loss is always a heartbreaking part of any story. But I think that once the reader begins to understand the character better and grows an attachment, any tragic or sad situation can affect the reader.

3) Do you feel more attached if you have a rough idea of what the person looks like, or if like everything is described (Of course not in one paragraph, but just little things here and there)?

I don't think I need to know what the character looks like. Like Keladry said, I create my own appearances for the characters, regardless of any detailed description provided in the book. Either way, though, I think that the writer should always include some description of the appearance throughout the story.

4) How do you stay motivated when typing past around chapter 5?

I'm not the best person to answer this question since I have a hard time staying motivated with my works. I guess the best thing you can do is to keep the inspiration lit. I also think it's helpful to have a thorough plan for a plot so that you don't hit a wall and lose all motivation. I did that to myself. But yeah, just keep your inspiration going by reading, listening to music, watching movies, or whatever you find works best for you!!!!
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Old 04-12-2015, 02:33 PM View Post #8 (Link)
han123 (Offline)
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Thank you so much guys!!! You've all been extremely helpful
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Old 10-19-2015, 04:59 PM View Post #9 (Link)
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Watching the character change.
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Old 02-10-2016, 01:22 AM View Post #10 (Link)
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I would be attached more to the main character because it is what most readers would want to get through the story on how the main character survived in the story.
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