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Old 11-14-2014, 07:26 PM View Post #1 (Link) Freeditorial Publishing is now open for submissions
Freeditorial (Offline)
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Hello everyone,


A special thanks to Young Writers Online for creating this Marketing and Publishing Resource section for their members.

We are very pleased to inform you that Freeditorial is now open for submissions.

At this time are looking for books written in English only.

To be considered, please submit your proposal at:

freeditorial.com/writers/new

If your book is accepted, we will come back with an offer.

Whether or not your book is accepted, we will always respond as soon as possible.

Writers will get paid the sum of money agreed upon before we publish their book.

You can also take advantage of our library of 40,000+ Free e-books in 10 widely spoken languages

You may want to see some of the talented writers discovered by Freeditorial recently, under "Recommended Books" on our homepage.

Wishing the best of luck to everyone!

Freeditorial
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Old 11-14-2014, 08:10 PM View Post #2 (Link)
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I have a few questions, if you wouldn't mind answering. It appears you operate on a standard submission process, and are not a platform for self-publishing, so what can you offer an author's book that other venues can't? In the submission page (or, at least, the first page) it states:

Every writer can advertise his book published by Freeditorial as he sees fit. The Publishing House will highlight the book in its section of “recommended books” for a time to help introduce it to the general public.
This sounds, to me, as though highlighting the book in the "recommended" section is the only advertising Freeditorial will perform, leaving the bulk of that work to the author. Considering you are also demanding all digital worldwide rights for an indefinite amount of time, this seems like less control than certain self-publishing venues offer, but without the advantage of a publishing company's resources. If I am mistaken, please clarify.

Is there some way I can see the bios of some of the people responsible for my book, should I submit? Who's behind acquisitions? Copyediting? Technical editing? What experience do they have? I understand that maybe there are too many people to list them all, but why not highlight a few of the heads, so that I can be sure the person responsible for editing my book isn't also splitting their time between translating public domain novels for your library?

When I selected one of the recommended books to see more about it, a download of the ebook began immediately. I tested this on a second book, thinking maybe this was just one free book in the midst of ones that were for sale. However, the second book also began downloading instantly. For one thing, I would recommend making it more clear when a download was going to happen, as I for one am always distrustful of files that just begin downloading on their own. However, this also makes me concerned about where your revenues are coming from if ebooks don't cost any money. Unless I selected public domain novels (and I doubt it, as the title of one included the acronym "OMG") it seems as though your revenue comes completely from the ad space you sell through our books (as according to the "Terms and Conditions" which, by the way, are not aligned with the rest of the subheaders at the bottom of the page). This leads me to believe that advances, or whatever you want to call the payments you give to the authors, will be rather low, exacerbated by the fact an author receives no money from their book sales after the fact. And what is this ad space selling? Is it advertisement for other novels Freeditorial has published, or is it open ad space for anyone who wants to buy it? Again, I'm left wondering why I should choose Freeditorial over another of the many options that leave me more control. Feel free to pitch yourself.

I'd also be concerned with the idea that my novel would get lost in the forest that is the hundreds/thousands of public domain novels you've uploaded so far. There are also user interface issues I have, such as the only way I can search for a novel (outside of not knowing the author or title--say I'm just browsing) is by entering my preferred language and a "literary genre" as vague as "Novel". Do you have any plans to address these issues?

Freeditorial has also posted this exact same thread on another writing forum I frequent, and people over there are far more dubious. Until Freeditorial answers some of these questions (and, to be honest, I'd be surprised if they came back as this seems like mass spam advertising), I recommend anyone who comes across this thread to pass.
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						Last edited by Infinity_Man; 11-15-2014 at 05:01 AM.
					
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Old 11-17-2014, 09:30 PM View Post #3 (Link)
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Originally Posted by Infinity_Man View Post
I have a few questions, if you wouldn't mind answering. It appears you operate on a standard submission process, and are not a platform for self-publishing, so what can you offer an author's book that other venues can't? In the submission page (or, at least, the first page) it states:



This sounds, to me, as though highlighting the book in the "recommended" section is the only advertising Freeditorial will perform, leaving the bulk of that work to the author. Considering you are also demanding all digital worldwide rights for an indefinite amount of time, this seems like less control than certain self-publishing venues offer, but without the advantage of a publishing company's resources. If I am mistaken, please clarify.

Is there some way I can see the bios of some of the people responsible for my book, should I submit? Who's behind acquisitions? Copyediting? Technical editing? What experience do they have? I understand that maybe there are too many people to list them all, but why not highlight a few of the heads, so that I can be sure the person responsible for editing my book isn't also splitting their time between translating public domain novels for your library?

When I selected one of the recommended books to see more about it, a download of the ebook began immediately. I tested this on a second book, thinking maybe this was just one free book in the midst of ones that were for sale. However, the second book also began downloading instantly. For one thing, I would recommend making it more clear when a download was going to happen, as I for one am always distrustful of files that just begin downloading on their own. However, this also makes me concerned about where your revenues are coming from if ebooks don't cost any money. Unless I selected public domain novels (and I doubt it, as the title of one included the acronym "OMG") it seems as though your revenue comes completely from the ad space you sell through our books (as according to the "Terms and Conditions" which, by the way, are not aligned with the rest of the subheaders at the bottom of the page). This leads me to believe that advances, or whatever you want to call the payments you give to the authors, will be rather low, exacerbated by the fact an author receives no money from their book sales after the fact. And what is this ad space selling? Is it advertisement for other novels Freeditorial has published, or is it open ad space for anyone who wants to buy it? Again, I'm left wondering why I should choose Freeditorial over another of the many options that leave me more control. Feel free to pitch yourself.

I'd also be concerned with the idea that my novel would get lost in the forest that is the hundreds/thousands of public domain novels you've uploaded so far. There are also user interface issues I have, such as the only way I can search for a novel (outside of not knowing the author or title--say I'm just browsing) is by entering my preferred language and a "literary genre" as vague as "Novel". Do you have any plans to address these issues?

Freeditorial has also posted this exact same thread on another writing forum I frequent, and people over there are far more dubious. Until Freeditorial answers some of these questions (and, to be honest, I'd be surprised if they came back as this seems like mass spam advertising), I recommend anyone who comes across this thread to pass.


Hello Infinity Man,

I’m glad you posted these questions as it gives us the chance to clarify some points. Yes indeed, we posted a similar announcement to a select 5 writing forums, since this is where we are most likely to communicate directly with quality writers. Also since we got common questions with the forum in question, we will use some of the same answers.

Freeditorial is buying only the digital publishing rights of the book from the writer and promoting it on its platform universally. Writers, especially novices, always have great difficulty publishing their books. The amount that Freeditorial pays for the digital publishing rights of these books depends on several variables: Whether you are a fairly new or rather established writer; if it’s a novel, article, essay, poetry, etc. For example on our most recent additions under Recommended Books on our homepage, there is the book titled “The record”, for which Freeditorial paid a European writer “Victor Saltero” $85,000. Another recent deal, is a short novel for which the was paid over 5,000$. You will see this novel soon under Recommended Books.

The most recent digital titles have been purchased for a period ranging from 2 years to 10. The terms and conditions of purchase are set individually for each contract prior to the publication of the book. The writer always gets paid the amount agreed upon before the book is published on our platform.

I think you confused self-publishing with buying digital publishing rights. We offer both options on our site. In this thread however, we are only discussing buying digital publishing rights. There is no individual contract for self-publishing. The writer is then bound only by the terms and conditions on our website. Our revenue model is based mainly on advertising. Ads are never intrusive to the reader, ie the UNESCO sponsorship message on our site. Freeditorial is also a Free library of 40,000+ books in several languages. Public domain novels are handled by a different department. The Recommended section contains only the contemporary, purchased books.

Freeditorial is opening a door of new possibilities for writers where they not only have a great opportunity to publish their books and get paid for it, but also gain access to a promotion on a scale unimaginable to traditional publishers or with self-publishing.

Thank you for posting your questions.
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Old 11-17-2014, 10:26 PM View Post #4 (Link)
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Thanks for responding, Freeditorial! Please don't assume that my accusation that this was mass spam is personal--we happen to get several people who join the forum, advertise what they want to advertise, and leave. Usually we close these threads, or delete them outright.

Again, thank you for taking the time to respond to some of my questions, though I still have some questions if you don't mind taking more time to answer them.

Originally Posted by Freeditorial View Post
Freeditorial is buying only the digital publishing rights of the book from the writer and promoting it on its platform universally.
Freeditorial is opening a door of new possibilities for writers where they not only have a great opportunity to publish their books and get paid for it, but also gain access to a promotion on a scale unimaginable to traditional publishers or with self-publishing.
Could you please clarify what kind of promotion you would be doing? How will it vary if this is my first time being published as opposed to, say, my fifth book after a successful four other books?

Writers, especially novices, always have great difficulty publishing their books.
Certainly. What will Freeditorial do that makes that process easier for me? There's still a submission process, after all. What do you do to make sure the publishing process is easier for me while balancing quality products?

I think you confused self-publishing with buying digital publishing rights. We offer both options on our site. In this thread however, we are only discussing buying digital publishing rights. There is no individual contract for self-publishing. The writer is then bound only by the terms and conditions on our website.
Ah, yes, I see how I read that wrong now. Thank you.

I still feel as though my main question hasn't been answered, though: What do you offer that another publisher doesn't, or what can I get from self-publishing through you rather than another means (I know you wish to focus on your publishing side, but I figured while I'm at it I might as well ask.

Also, what kind of exposure does self-publishing through Freeditorial offer? Are the Recommended books on the side only authors who have been published via a contract? If so, is it nearly impossible to find a self-published book without knowing the author's name or book title? Or does the recommended books also include self-published?
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Old 12-04-2014, 02:34 PM View Post #5 (Link)
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Hello Infinity_Man

You're welcome. Thank you for taking the time to ask these questions.

We advertise our writers’ names and books directly to targeted audiences, mostly depending on the book genre. Keep in mind that our profit is directly proportional to our writer’s success. Therefore, it is in our every interest to promote their book. Also, because it will be free to download, more readers would be encouraged to read the book and share it with others. We cannot say the same when a relatively unknown writer is trying to sell, it becomes that much more difficult to convince a reader to give their book a try. So, we give the contracted writer a middle ground solution; the benefits of giving their book for free as mentioned above, plus a payment from Freeditorial before the book is even published. Duration of our ownership of the digital publishing right, and the lump sum to be paid out in return, are discussed individually with each writer.

It costs most traditional publishers a considerable amount of money to get a book out, between print, distribution and other logistics. This is why they only invest in famous, well established authors. These authors do not need much marketing and branding. They have a base of followers awaiting their book, and the publisher is not taking any risk whatsoever on them.
On the other hand, we kept such costs to a minimum, which is why we can afford to promote and buy from more new writers and take risks where we see potential.

No, our Recommended Books do not contain only writers who have been published via a contract. If we like a self-published book, we may add it to the list of Recommended Books along with contracted, paid authors.

Because we are a Publishing House, not a online retail website with a publishing platform, we do not have an agenda, and we are not using books as a technique to push sales for an electronic book reader. Therefore our books are optimized to be in the proper format no matter which gadget the reader is using. I advise any serious writer to purchase or borrow several types of e-readers, and test each publisher and online bookstore to see how a book would look on each e-reader. They may be in for a surprise. In other words, we have the reader’s best interest in mind first. And where you can attract and retain readers, you attract attention to the new writers.

I hope this answers your questions.
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Old 12-05-2014, 08:26 AM View Post #6 (Link)
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Thanks for coming back. Just a few things...

Originally Posted by Freeditorial View Post
Hello Infinity_Man
We advertise our writers’ names and books directly to targeted audiences, mostly depending on the book genre.
Great, but this still doesn't tell me how you advertise the books, which is what I've been asking.

Keep in mind that our profit is directly proportional to our writer’s success. Therefore, it is in our every interest to promote their book.
Sure, but what kind of promotion could I expect as a new writer?

We cannot say the same when a relatively unknown writer is trying to sell, it becomes that much more difficult to convince a reader to give their book a try. So, we give the contracted writer a middle ground solution; the benefits of giving their book for free as mentioned above, plus a payment from Freeditorial before the book is even published.
Yes, this is an advance. I would expect an advance from most established publishers (albeit a smaller one for small publishers, or none at all for start-ups).

It costs most traditional publishers a considerable amount of money to get a book out, between print, distribution and other logistics. This is why they only invest in famous, well established authors.
This is simply not true. "Traditional" publishers publish debuts all the time. They're the ones with the money--earned from the famous, well established authors--to actually publish debuts. Let's go through the Big 5 and list some examples, shall we?
Hachette published Edan Lepucki's "California" and Stephan Eirik Clark's "Sweetness #9" this past summer; HarperCollins recently debuted Diane Cook's "Man V. Nature" (A short story collection, no less) and recently signed a three-book contract for Eliza Henry-Jones' "In The Quiet.; MacMillan this year published Nickolas Butler's first novel "Shotgun Lovesongs" and Sandy Hall's debut "A Little Something Different"; Tom Weldon, UK chief executive of Penguin Random House, claims they publish 200 to 250 debut authors a year, including (deep breath) Carys Bray's "A Song For Issy Bradley: A Novel", Peter Buwalda's "Bonita Avenue: A Novel", Michael Christie's "If I Fall, If I Die", Tom Cooper's "The Marauders: A Novel", Yannick Grannac's "The Goddess of Small Victories," etc. etc.; Simon and Schuster will be publishing "Etta and Otto and Russell and James" by Emma Hooper and Jamie Kornegay's "Soil." These are just a few examples.
I'd be careful. The "Big Publishers Don't Publish New Authors" argument is typical of vanity publishers and scams--I'd avoid this kind of language in case you are seen as one.

On the other hand, we kept such costs to a minimum, which is why we can afford to promote and buy from more new writers and take risks where we see potential.
But how do you keep costs to a minimum? And how will you promote?

It's nice to hear that your format is wide-spread.
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