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Old 02-04-2016, 11:25 AM View Post #1 (Link) Developing a writing style
DestinyVamp (Offline)
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This has been a big problem for me, I want to develop a style of writing which I don't understand how
I know I am an immature writer though I can brainstorm my manuscript like a video processor with a costly internet connection (Sorry if it sounds too snooty) But I have no idea how to put it into words in a way it looks how I've seen it...We can consult a thesaurus to come up with a better wording but those wriggling phrases...I don't know how to construct them.
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Old 02-04-2016, 09:25 PM View Post #2 (Link)
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I'm a little lost by the wording of this question but I'm going to try and address this subject as best as I can. Developing a style isn't something that you just do. Faulkner, Foster-Wallace, Camus, Woolf, and so on--these people developed their style because they wanted something specific from their writing. They wanted their stories to read in certain ways, and they wanted to engage with certain ideas. The style of their prose reflects that. So I don't really think anyone can tell you how to develop a style. It's a very personal process, and, more so, fairly complicated. Style boils down to more than just the appearance of your prose.

For instance, take Flannery O'Connor. Her prose is fairly straight forward and typically not remarkable, at least in contrast to, say, William Faulkner. However, one of the more unique aspects of her style is how she writes third person: using a perspective that wavers between third-person close and third-person omniscient. She also has a tendency to write "ugly" or "grotesque" characters (though she contested this to an extent). That affects her word choice, the kinds of settings she might utilize and, therefore, the kind of imagery she invokes. She was also a devout Catholic, and that affects the kind of journeys her characters take, again, her word choice, and the kinds of metaphors and similes she uses.

I think, for a lot of writers, style isn't always a conscious choice. You just try to make your piece read the way you want it to, in a way that feels right. Writing, and then refining/editing/revising ultimately come down to visceral decisions. Your story just has to sit right with you. There are exceptions to this, but those people tend to want something radically different than traditional story telling. They want to go into unexplored space, so to speak, and as such they have to be more mindful about the stylistic decisions they're making.

So, ultimately, if you're concerned about style, you can try asking yourself what it is you want to accomplish as a writer. If you want to tell a good story, first and foremost, then a traditional approach may suit you best. That typically entails stripped-down prose, relatable characters, and employing a three-act structure for your plot. If you want other things, well, you have a bit of a harder task cut out for you, but it's also a very fun task.

I hope this was cohesive. Please feel free to ask questions.
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Old 02-05-2016, 01:34 PM View Post #3 (Link)
DestinyVamp (Offline)
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Of thanks but what is the problem with the wording
(I know my English sucks but it will be good to know what exactly the issue is)
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Old 02-05-2016, 04:38 PM View Post #4 (Link)
Georgy (Offline)
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Originally Posted by DestinyVamp View Post
Of thanks but what is the problem with the wording
(I know my English sucks but it will be good to know what exactly the issue is)
Firstly, your brain like "a video processor with a costly internet connection" doesn't sound snooty, it sounds droll (in the best sense of the word).
Secondly, when you're obsessed by concern as to how to please the interlocutor and win his(her) sympathy your conversation is doomed to be dull. Why?
When your personality is strained because of extreme desire to be liked, your inward natural drive is squeezed. You look strained, you sound unnatural, your interlocutor feels your discomfort and he feels embarrassed.
Where am I driving at? The same thing happens when your are inclined to torment your brain by thoughts like "how to get a writing style, what kind of style suits me better, what about this, what about that, and so forth and so forth."
Always be yourself ( but try to be the best part of yourself ) that's what I would recommend you, and always strive for natural style of writing. It's impossible to deceive a reader( for a long time, at least), so be natural, be sincere, even if you are tough and unlikable like Henry Miller.
In fact, your style is your personality, your style is the natural originality of your inward world, your style is deeply rooted not in your head(where you are wrongly trying to find it) but in your heart. Listen to your heart, all the rest is just a technique.
So, learn your heart, first, then work on writing technique, and good luck.

And special thanks to Dabs for his comment. I find it interesting and useful.
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Old 02-05-2016, 04:47 PM View Post #5 (Link)
DestinyVamp (Offline)
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oh thanks, Georgy, but if you have seen my writing I bet your opinion will change (if you think, it is fine to write the way I do)
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Old 02-06-2016, 12:17 AM View Post #6 (Link)
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Originally Posted by DestinyVamp View Post
But I have no idea how to put it into words in a way it looks how I've seen it...We can consult a thesaurus to come up with a better wording but those wriggling phrases...I don't know how to construct them.
You're saying you're having a hard time expressing something, but I don't know what the something is. That's why it confused me.
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Old 02-24-2016, 05:53 AM View Post #7 (Link)
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I would suggest reading more. You can learn writing styles when you read, especially when you read a lot.
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Old 04-13-2016, 07:40 AM View Post #8 (Link)
dayle (Offline)
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You should have writing style techniques to be able to develop your own writing style. I believe that there are 4 types of writing style where you can compare to yours.
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Old 04-13-2016, 11:53 AM View Post #9 (Link)
DestinyVamp (Offline)
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Yeah, I'll a look by the way, what's the difference between them?
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I can be by myself because I'm never lonely; I'm simply alone, living in my heavily populated solitude, a harum-scarum of infinity and eternity, and Infinity and Eternity seem to take a liking to the likes of me.
― Bohumil Hrabal, Too Loud a Solitude
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Old 04-18-2016, 03:06 AM View Post #10 (Link)
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I know this is from a while back.

But I was scrolling through this thread, and I got excited.

You're saying you're having a hard time expressing something, but I don't know what the something is.
Isn't this literally the point of writing? You feel something out in your brain, some idea, some aesthetic, and a part of you is certain that it is brilliant (and I would say it is), and then you have to struggle to express it as purely as possible. So DestinyVamp, if you're struggling to find a writing style, don't worry. It just means you're trying to express something meaningful/complex. It just means that you're a writer.
  
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