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Old 05-14-2015, 01:00 AM View Post #1 (Link) Should students be forced to read.
Softballgirl333 (Offline)
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Ok so that my school we have something called AR. In AR you have to meet your goal or it goes in as a 0 or partial credit. Some students dint have the time to read or don't want to. So why should we be forced and graded on reading, I get if it's a test then yeah rake a grade. I just don't get why we have to have a grade on it. Like I'm totally fine with it a get 100% everytime but some people don't or they can't comprehend what their reading,


I need thoughts please.
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:20 AM View Post #2 (Link)
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Some students dint have time to read or don't want to.
If we based schooling on what the student wanted to do, there'd be no schooling.

Also, there's been a lot of studies on tests that suggest they can be ineffective grading tools--moreso the big, mass-procedure tests that every student in the nation takes, but a lot of the reasoning stays the same in smaller tests: basically, it teaches students that their only worth is based on how well they do in a high-stress game of memorization and reproduction. And some students are really good at that. Some students hate that though, and excel in other areas--such as discussion or reading or creating projects or presentations or performances, what have you. The "I get if it's a test" mentality limits that potential down to "they have to be good at this, and only this." And, frankly, I'd rather less emphasis was put on how well students could do on tests, and more on a wide field that could better represent the varied way students learn.

As for why we should read at all--you argue that these students can't comprehend what they're reading, to which I say that's the whole point of reading. If they're having trouble reading, the solution isn't to let them stop reading. It's actually to make them read more (but making them read the right things, that are more in line with their skill level, and working their way up to the expected level; unfortunately, the school system doesn't have a lot of room for this extra reading, and the student is expected to keep up with their grade level, which is a weakness of the school system). Reading does a lot of things, such as build empathy, but above all it gets you familiar with the language in interesting ways that just being told the functions can't. Like learning any language, it's much easier to get it down by interacting with it in everyday life, and reading is that way.

But, really, school is about being forced to do things that you might not like to do, and then being graded on them. It might not be a perfect system, and it's good to question it, but it's also good to question it for reasons other than "I don't want to do this."
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:28 AM View Post #3 (Link)
Softballgirl333 (Offline)
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Originally Posted by Infinity_Man View Post
If we based schooling on what the student wanted to do, there'd be no schooling.

Also, there's been a lot of studies on tests that suggest they can be ineffective grading tools--moreso the big, mass-procedure tests that every student in the nation takes, but a lot of the reasoning stays the same in smaller tests: basically, it teaches students that their only worth is based on how well they do in a high-stress game of memorization and reproduction. And some students are really good at that. Some students hate that though, and excel in other areas--such as discussion or reading or creating projects or presentations or performances, what have you. The "I get if it's a test" mentality limits that potential down to "they have to be good at this, and only this." And, frankly, I'd rather less emphasis was put on how well students could do on tests, and more on a wide field that could better represent the varied way students learn.

As for why we should read at all--you argue that these students can't comprehend what they're reading, to which I say that's the whole point of reading. If they're having trouble reading, the solution isn't to let them stop reading. It's actually to make them read more (but making them read the right things, that are more in line with their skill level, and working their way up to the expected level; unfortunately, the school system doesn't have a lot of room for this extra reading, and the student is expected to keep up with their grade level, which is a weakness of the school system). Reading does a lot of things, such as build empathy, but above all it gets you familiar with the language in interesting ways that just being told the functions can't. Like learning any language, it's much easier to get it down by interacting with it in everyday life, and reading is that way.

But, really, school is about being forced to do things that you might not like to do, and then being graded on them. It might not be a perfect system, and it's good to question it, but it's also good to question it for reasons other than "I don't want to do this."
My whole thing is, is that they base your reading level off a non-graded test. Most of the text is short instead of a book. So if you excel in short reading then your obviously going to do well and score in a high grade k Evelyn of that test. But if you don't excel in reading long stories then that test is a total lie. So if you score well on the test but wanna read down a level they won't let you. That's my whole point. Students should get to choose their goal and read at the level they want to. Not have it all based on a test.
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:41 AM View Post #4 (Link)
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Originally Posted by Softballgirl333 View Post
That's my whole point. Students should get to choose their goal and read at the level they want to. Not have it all based on a test.
Mmm, see, when you said:
I get if it's a test then yeah rake a grade
It sounded like you were saying "I understand getting a grade if it's a test" as opposed to getting a grade in some other way (I don't know what "rake a grade" means; I took a guess).

Also, if your point is that students should get to choose their goal, you probably should have used those words in your original post, or even mentioned that they can't choose the goal in the original post.
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:25 AM View Post #5 (Link)
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I think it would make more sense for an educational professional to decide what level of reading is appropriate for a student and challenge them accordingly. A kid can make many of his or her own decisions, but they don't often see the bigger picture behind many educational decisions. I don't expect a kid to be able to understand his or her own critical analysis ability well enough to choose texts that will properly challenge them. How well you understand the language is only one part of what factors into reading ability. Understanding a text's underlying messages, themes, and ideas are also important, and kids don't often have the abstract thinking capability to measure this themselves. Rather, if they do, it's nowhere near as sharp as a trained, certified teacher's capability.

So, while many kids may be forced to read texts that aren't compatible with their skill levels, that doesn't mean kids should be choosing what they read. They should be voicing their thoughts if they're struggling, yes, but ultimately the teacher needs to be making the right choice. If the system doesn't allow teachers to meet their students' needs, then the system needs to be confronted.
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Old 05-14-2015, 11:42 AM View Post #6 (Link)
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On the topic of students not being able to read things because it's out of their comfortable ability:

Once I was in my English hallway, and I almost tripped over a box of Twilight books. I was half-disgusted, half-perplexed, and I asked my English teacher why someone had vomited all over the floor. She laughed and said that a handful of young students had before never wanted to touch reading as they felt uncomfortable and too stupid. Twilight, while being a poor example of what reading can be, really helped these students and it was brought right down to their level of understanding and enjoyment. Luckily for them, they didn't analyse the crap out of it and realise how sexist and rapey the book is. And it worked. They were more than keen to continue on with Lord of the Flies.
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Old 05-14-2015, 12:07 PM View Post #7 (Link)
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Originally Posted by Infinity_Man View Post
Mmm, see, when you said:

It sounded like you were saying "I understand getting a grade if it's a test" as opposed to getting a grade in some other way (I don't know what "rake a grade" means; I took a guess).

Also, if your point is that students should get to choose their goal, you probably should have used those words in your original post, or even mentioned that they can't choose the goal in the original post.
Yeah I probably should've said that. Yeah it's take a test. My iPad hates me so yeah,
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Old 05-14-2015, 12:10 PM View Post #8 (Link)
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Originally Posted by Dabs View Post
I think it would make more sense for an educational professional to decide what level of reading is appropriate for a student and challenge them accordingly. A kid can make many of his or her own decisions, but they don't often see the bigger picture behind many educational decisions. I don't expect a kid to be able to understand his or her own critical analysis ability well enough to choose texts that will properly challenge them. How well you understand the language is only one part of what factors into reading ability. Understanding a text's underlying messages, themes, and ideas are also important, and kids don't often have the abstract thinking capability to measure this themselves. Rather, if they do, it's nowhere near as sharp as a trained, certified teacher's capability.

So, while many kids may be forced to read texts that aren't compatible with their skill levels, that doesn't mean kids should be choosing what they read. They should be voicing their thoughts if they're struggling, yes, but ultimately the teacher needs to be making the right choice. If the system doesn't allow teachers to meet their students' needs, then the system needs to be confronted.
Yes I understand that but the teacher doesn't choose our goal. A stupid test system does, that's my point.
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Old 05-15-2015, 01:05 AM View Post #9 (Link)
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And my point is that students shouldn't be choosing that goal, either, at least until they're old enough to understand how much goes into reading and writing education.
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Old 09-09-2015, 03:38 PM View Post #10 (Link)
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Yes. A society of open minds is surely better than a society of closed ones?
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