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Old 09-23-2015, 02:10 PM View Post #11 (Link)
ScottyMcGee (Offline)
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Originally Posted by Lizzie View Post

Once I was in my English hallway, and I almost tripped over a box of Twilight books. I was half-disgusted, half-perplexed, and I asked my English teacher why someone had vomited all over the floor. She laughed and said that a handful of young students had before never wanted to touch reading as they felt uncomfortable and too stupid. Twilight, while being a poor example of what reading can be, really helped these students and it was brought right down to their level of understanding and enjoyment. Luckily for them, they didn't analyse the crap out of it and realise how sexist and rapey the book is. And it worked. They were more than keen to continue on with Lord of the Flies.
EDIT: Never mind. I read that wrong and thought you meant the students DID realize it was sexist and rapey but then were keen to move on to better literature.

Regardless, bad literature is kind of a stepping stone for people who don't like to read. Then hopefully later on they'll build up their reading skills and look back and think, "Wow, that stuff I read at first was BAAAD."

I remember I read The Jester by James Patterson because I knew I needed to read at least one of his books before I could adequately say "I hate James Patterson." I chugged along with it, like drinking a horrid cough syrup. I brought the book with me to a diner and the waitress talked to me for a bit. She then tapped the book and said, "Oh, James Patterson. I love him. He's a great writer."

And I was just like
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Old 09-23-2015, 09:56 PM View Post #12 (Link)
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Originally Posted by Infinity_Man View Post
If we based schooling on what the student wanted to do, there'd be no schooling.
Wow, I could really argue that right there. But I'm way too passionate about that topic, and it's totally offtopic for this thread and I have a million other things to do, so I'll creep away quietly and leave behind a bit of sparkledust representing my firm disagreement.

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Old 09-26-2015, 10:55 PM View Post #13 (Link)
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Anything isa lot of books I LOVE I can't read at school! Because the level is too low, so I have to find a book I don't have and then take a quiz on it. Our reading and accelerated reader points (AR) IS 10% of our grades. And some people don't have time to read, I do but I know a girl who plays r sports, is in band and choir and has a practice every day of the week. Does it look like people like her or even me with softball have time to read every single day and then take a quiz on it? The answer is NO! That what makes me so made.
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Old 09-28-2015, 01:10 AM View Post #14 (Link)
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I believe the question "Should students be forced to read?" and "Should students have to take AR tests?" are rather different questions.

My short answer is yes, students need to be reading. AR tests are just a tool that can be used. Sometimes AR can be very beneficial and effective, and sometimes it can be easily misused.

I have so many opinions and stories on the subject but I'll try to be brief.

Most of my experience of AR tests is with elementary students, but I know you're older than that. It sounds like you're saying you get a grade for meeting your AR goal at the end of the week, and you want to know whether you should be required to do something that seems kind of pointless and frustrating?

One of the big things AR testing does is give a lot of data to the teacher about where the class is as a whole and how they're doing on their reading, even when the teacher can't personally check up on their students. If a student is consistently doing poorly on AR tests, that could give the teacher early warning to other problems that they wouldn't have known without the assistance of AR.

On a practical level, I consider AR tests a very reasonable way of getting students to read at least a minimum outside of school. Maybe not the best way, but at least it's something. 10% is not very much of a grade. You can skip AR all together and still get a high B, or if you tend to do poorly on assignments, 10% boost from just doing your AR work can be a good padding.

If you have books you love to read that you can't read in school, that's fine! Read them outside of school! You're not limited to the choices of books your AR test suggests. When I started High School, I was scared because a friend of mine who was several years older had threatened me "You won't have any time to read free reading books. You'll have to read what they tell you and that's it." I found that to be a pretty big myth. Whether it is actually worth making time for reading depends on your priorities.

I'm curious what your thoughts are on alternatives to AR testing, or do you think students shouldn't be forced to read at all outside of school? Would it be okay if you still were required to take AR tests, but it wasn't graded and put in the grade book? Would it be okay if they gave you quizzes on books you liked to read, instead of the ones that are too low? I asked my brother about AR, and he says that when he was doing the program, his teacher could add quizzes for the books he read if they weren't already part of the AR reading lists. Can your teachers do that? Would it make any difference?
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						Last edited by Keladry; 09-28-2015 at 01:13 AM.
					
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Old 10-06-2015, 04:19 PM View Post #15 (Link)
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Well the thing is for a middle school-er that plays sports and are in clubs and are fairly busy read 30 minutes a day to reach a goal we didn't even set and we have to choose books in a certain zone is pretty hard on us. i understand reading is essential for kids and teenagers but my entire thing is let us set a goal for our selves and let us set a zone we want to read in. i have so many books i love to read but they either are 1000 pages long or way under my ZPD level. if you want my to read at least let me be able to choose books i want to read freely and not restrict what I'm able to read. m not gonna read something i don't like because its in my ZPD level i should be able to choose what i read freely just trying to reach a goal. this is all apart of my point!
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Old 10-06-2015, 09:54 PM View Post #16 (Link)
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Do you mean it's all a part of your point or it's all apart from your point?

I will say I can actually agree with that. Choosing your own books and creating your own goals is important and really is a better way to learn. AR testing doesn't really have anything to do with that kind of reading, which is maybe unfortunate.

Being busy isn't really relevant, though. Schoolwork and homework/reading comes first in the hierarchy of high school-- any extracurricular activities someone takes on come with the understanding that you're going to be a lot more busy and will still have to do your homework.
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Old 10-16-2015, 01:55 AM View Post #17 (Link)
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Reading is a magical thing if people don't understand that then they have some SERIOUS problems!
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