Forum
Community Forum
Today's Posts
FAQ & Rules
Members List

Writing
Writing Forum
Recent Posts
Critique Guidelines

Groups
YWO Social Groups
Facebook
Myspace

Chat
 
YWA

Register

Store
Support YWO
YWO Merchandise
The Book Despository
Amazon.com (US)
Amazon.co.uk (UK)
Amazon.ca (Canada)

SBS Mag


Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-27-2015, 11:31 PM View Post #1 (Link) School DRESS CODES!
Softballgirl333 (Offline)
Scholarly Apprentice
 
Softballgirl333's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: On a Softball Field
Posts: 245
Points: 4
Times Thanked: 5
I'm very opinionated on this. Lemme just tell you my school dress code.
No shorts shorter than fingertip length
No skinny jeans or leggings unless you have a shirt that confers your butt
No showing shoulders
No holes in jeans
No tank tops, all shirts must have sleeves

Sme of these are understandable but the no leggings rule is creating big controversy at my school. It's really hard to find shorts that aren't booty shorts and jeans that don't kill you in 90 heat. I need opinions and questions on what you think about school dress code.
__________________
~Always Forgive, Never forget. Learn from my mistakes; But I won't regret~

~Anonymous~
 
Old 08-27-2015, 11:49 PM View Post #2 (Link)
kidzrulz101 (Offline)
Abstract Thinker
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: The United States of America
Posts: 31
Points: 2.64
Times Thanked: 3
Whoa, cool. I'm homeschooled, but we have a dress-code also. Here's ours:

I must where a skirt or dress.
I must where socks during school hours.
I must wear a hair ribbon.
__________________
The two most important days in your life are the day you are born, and the day you find out why. ~Mark Twain
 
Old 08-28-2015, 12:06 AM View Post #3 (Link)
Isis (Offline)
Global Moderator
 
Isis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 1,734
Points: 30
Times Thanked: 354
This sounds like a sexist, though standard, dress code. Both of them.
 
Old 08-28-2015, 12:09 AM View Post #4 (Link)
kidzrulz101 (Offline)
Abstract Thinker
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: The United States of America
Posts: 31
Points: 2.64
Times Thanked: 3
No way, Isis. Those rules are rules I came up with. Not the other way around, I came up with them so I could become a good student.
__________________
The two most important days in your life are the day you are born, and the day you find out why. ~Mark Twain
 
Old 08-28-2015, 10:54 PM View Post #5 (Link)
Dabs (Offline)
Freelance Writer
 
Dabs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 1,885
Points: 30
Times Thanked: 151
My high school was, thankfully, very lax with dress codes, both for boys and girls. I mean, I think they technically had a dress code on the books for girls, but it was never enforced because honestly the teachers didn't even remotely care about that kind of thing. I wore some... provocative shirts quite often, too. One of them had a pentagram--you know, the satan symbol--and said "Religion Sickens Me!" on the back.

I was a giant weenie hardcore mofo.

Edit: Oh, wait. Debate thread.

I'm not a fan of dress codes. Dress doesn't interfere with education unless you allow it to. We should encourage people to mind their own business.
 
Old 08-29-2015, 02:49 AM View Post #6 (Link)
owl (Offline)
Scholarly Apprentice
 
owl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 234
Points: 20
Times Thanked: 41
Quite frankly, I believe the way dress codes are policed is a bigger distraction than the "inappropriate" habits of dress they're meant to curb. My school did not strictly police the dress code, though when people did get written up for a dress violation, it was usually because they were wearing a hat. That said, guys got written up for hat violations WAY more than girls; my best girl friend in high school regularly wore a sombrero around.

That said, the principle behind certain dress codes bothers me. Now that the fear good young boys from our exurban town might join a scary gang has died down, the hat rule is put in terms of etiquette, as it is rude to wear a hat inside. But summer clothing is termed as a "distraction." Spaghetti straps and straps thinner than two finger's width, shorts and skirts shorter than your fingertips, and probably a few other items of clothing were technically prohibited for girls. Boys had far fewer restrictions. I think their restrictions were "don't wear your pants so low we can see your entire behind" and "don't wear a t-shirt with profanities emblazoned on it" though the latter happened anyway. The idea behind the restrictions for girls is that their bodies are inherently a distraction for boys. Like, those were the words used. The clothing prohibited for girls was distracting.

Why is this problematic? Teenagers are, after all, very good at being distracted by each other.

This is a problem because it teaches young men to see women's bodies as already sexualized. This is really unfair to young women, and women in general, because women are not sexual objects. Think of it this way: we go through so much of our lives not thinking about the bodies of the people around us. Even when we are in sexually intimate relationships, we don't always think of our partner in sexual terms. In fact, I would say that the default is the non-sexualization of other people. But the language of these "distraction" dress codes suggest the opposite.

In practice, these dress codes single out girls for wearing clothes that keep them comfortable in class (WHY IS IT SO STUFFY IN SCHOOLS???) , and often these girls are visibly called out, sent to the office, and return to class in uncomfortable clothes/clothes that clearly reveal they broke the dress code. This takes the girl out of class when she could be learning, and singles her out, which I would argue has the potential to create a hostile classroom environment. Imagine how gross it feels to be told that what you wore because it's 95 degrees in your bio classroom is inappropriate because it might distract some hypothetical boy?

And when I think about the times I was harassed when I was in middle and high school, I wasn't wearing dress code breaking clothing. My skirts hit my knees, or my ankles. I wore sweatshirts. I was not sexy. The harassment I faced as a thirteen year old is not something I thought about or let myself remember until the climate at my university surrounding issues like these boiled over last year. I felt ashamed of my body, and I tried to hide it, and I think scumbags caught on to that and used my shame as leverage to shame me more and try to manipulate me. I was bullied verbally. I was groped. I was cornered. It took a while to learn how to stand up for myself; eventually, I learned that I could stand up and say ENOUGH and that would be the final word. But my shame kept me quiet about the way people spoke to me or approached me for a long time.

Now, I wear short shorts. I wear short skirts. I wear spaghetti straps, I wear crop tops, I wear skinny jeans and tuck my shirts in. My grandmother occasionally makes remarks suggesting I won't be taken seriously, or that guys only pay attention to me because I put my body on display, but this is not true: at my university, I am taken seriously by employers, professors, and peers because I am outspoken and comfortable in my skin. I've been asked out by different men, but they have always been respectful, kind, and interested in what I have to say. The harassment that I have experienced has been less individually targeted than the aggressive, threatening behavior I dealt with in middle school. Sexual violence is a problem at my school, and it's a problem at every school, but it is not a problem caused or exacerbated by how women dress. It is a problem fueled by the idea that women exist to be sexual objects for men to enjoy. Please see: the attitude on display with those stupid "daughter daycare" banners (a college in my adopted state, ugh ), the fact that women at my school are told by male peers -- specifically male peers, not professors or anyone else -- that they should get their Mrs instead of working.

I make this point because I worry that dress codes that teach girls to fear their bodies and to constantly think about how the men in the room will be reacting to them breed the kind of shame that I felt in middle school, and I worry that dress codes that teach girls to fear their bodies and teach boys to see women's bodies as things that are taboo breed the kind of environment where young women are targeted because they might look a certain way. I worry that it sets up kids to think in terms of good girls and bad girls, where good girls are not interested in romance or sex and wear the right things (and usually are interested in academic success) and bad girls show a little leg and are interested in romance or sex and thus are bad news and also probably have no intellectual life. This dichotomy is so false it makes me sick. How we dress and our interest in sex has no bearing on whether we are "good" or "bad." We should encourage children to see each other as whole, complex people. What matters is our honour, integrity, compassion, intellectual life, ambition. Another thing I wish I had learned earlier in my life.

I'm not saying that everyone should immediately start sporting leggings and crop tops, and all problems will be solved, and I do believe that it is fair for a school to ask its students to dress in certain ways, to lend a sense of seriousness to education. But most school dress codes are arbitrary and targeted at women's summer wear. I would much prefer a general uniform, or a uniform that allowed some variation. For example, slacks or a skirt, button up, sweater. Even better if they are in colours perscribed by the school. If everyone is wearing the same thing, you skirt (ba dum tss) the issue of arbitrarily singling students out, which is inevitably a problem in schools that try -- if only barely -- to enforce their dress codes. It takes the focus off of student's bodies and puts the emphasis on things like community feeling, or whether and how we bring gravitas to education through rituals like uniforms. Clothes to affect how we feel in different situations, and I don't think it is wrong to ask students to dress in a way that says they take education seriously. But it is wrong to suggest that girls must take boys' education seriously by preventing themselves from being looked at sexually. You can't prevent how people will look at you, and this approach fails to take the education of young women seriously. We do not deserve to be treated like a special case: we are half of the population. We should not be taught to see ourselves as potential distractors or detractors from the educational environment*. We belong there. Education is our right as equal and full citizens. We should not have to shrink ourselves for the benefit of the other half of the population.




*more anecdata: My boyfriend is an adult who makes his own decisions, and I sometimes still have trouble not believing I am a huge distraction from his studies. It sometimes makes me feel guilty when I want to just chill out with him on a Friday night, forget needing some company because I'm having a rough week. It is ultimately not my problem -- or yours -- if someone cannot handle your company; it's my guy's job to stay focused rather than crack fart jokes in my general direction. I never think about him being a distraction in my life, even though the logistics of balancing a serious relationship with work, school, volunteering, and friends seriously affects my ability to find time to write. So there you go. Many years later, being told my presence was inherently a potential distractor seems to have sunk in, and, funnily enough, my guilty feelings and sense that I am responsible for my boyfriend's educational environment (I'm not! he is!) distracts ME. Thanks, internalized sexism!
  
						Last edited by owl; 08-29-2015 at 03:11 AM.
Old 08-29-2015, 03:25 AM View Post #7 (Link)
TheMostSolidOfSnakes (Offline)
Novice Writer
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 11
Points: 17.76
Times Thanked: 0
I think that dress codes should exist to a degree. If I can see your reproductive organs or nipples (male or female) that's a little much.
 
Old 08-29-2015, 07:05 PM View Post #8 (Link)
Softballgirl333 (Offline)
Scholarly Apprentice
 
Softballgirl333's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: On a Softball Field
Posts: 245
Points: 4
Times Thanked: 5
So my while thing is guys can pretty much wear whatever they want with very little restriction like the sides cut off a Tshirt. You can wear that as long as you have something under it. No BOY at my school has NEVER EVER gotten in trouble for school dress code. Yet I can't wear my favorite pair of jeans to school without getting sent to the nurse. It's mostly getting girls to learn to cover up around guys that your skin showing is too distractive. Instead of teaching girls to cover up your skin., they need to teach guys (not all guys are like this I'm not trying to stereotype) to respect women and girls for what they wear.


Isis:
In my opinion it's very sexist.
__________________
~Always Forgive, Never forget. Learn from my mistakes; But I won't regret~

~Anonymous~
  
						Last edited by Softballgirl333; 08-29-2015 at 07:08 PM.
Old 08-29-2015, 07:16 PM View Post #9 (Link)
Softballgirl333 (Offline)
Scholarly Apprentice
 
Softballgirl333's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: On a Softball Field
Posts: 245
Points: 4
Times Thanked: 5
In addition to my other comment....... In gym class your can't wear........
  • Running shorts
    Basketball shorts (because they sag too much when you run)
    Leggings as said in the first post
    Anything tight fitted

Yet the volleyball team wears Spanks.
Football players wear tight fitted pants (as foes for softball and baseball
Basketball players get to wear basketball shorts
Tennis players get to wear tight fitted shorts
Track Members get to wear running shorts.

SEE WHATS WRONG WITH SCHOOL DRESS CODES???????
__________________
~Always Forgive, Never forget. Learn from my mistakes; But I won't regret~

~Anonymous~
 
Old 09-05-2015, 07:55 AM View Post #10 (Link)
han123 (Offline)
Literary Artist
 
han123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Somewhere nice :)
Posts: 331
Points: 24
Times Thanked: 42
my school have a small variety of clothes we can pick form to wear, but I'm quite happy with what I've got. I get to wear a pair of warm trackies, a tshirt and a hoodie. My school is also pretty lenient, my friend only got a detention the other day after not wearing school uniform for about 3 weeks haha.
__________________
Critiques: Ask and you shall receive
 
Closed Thread
Thread Tools

 


All times are GMT. The time now is 05:46 PM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7 - Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
All writing Copyright © its author(s). All other material Copyright © 2007-2012 Young Writers Online unless otherwise specified.
Managed by Andrew Kukwa (Andy) and Shaun Duke (Shaun) from The World in the Satin Bag. Design by HTWoRKS.