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Old 06-18-2012, 01:37 AM View Post #11 (Link)
BurningGrace (Offline)
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I like and agree with what Dabs is saying. I feel as though, when you're describing an "event/adventure" kind of story, like Dabs mentioned with JK Rowling's Harry Potter, you're not necessarily under the obligation of creating that "wow" character because your novel is more about the quest itself rather than the character going through it. Harry Potter may have been The Chosen One to stop Voldemort, but he was also the chosen vehicle to describe Voldemort's uprising to the readers.

You also mentioned Katniss from the Hunger Games. The reason that Katniss is not the most compelling character in the world is because Collins's novel does not focus on the character and her development; rather, the whole story is about the District's second uprising against the oppressive Capitol, and Katniss merely acts as a vehicle to display the action.

Of course, one exception of this "adventure without great characters" rule is George R.R. Martin, as his quest is not just compelling on its own, but his characters are so well-crafted that their viewpoints make it easy to continue the story.

Personally, I'm very picky about "quest" novels, and love to read books that have more of a focus on character development, because those are the memorable characters you usually see (though, don't get me wrong, there are a lot of novels out there that, while they don't center their book around the character, still create fabulous people). The most notable and memorable character that I've ever read was Scarlett O'Hara from Gone With the Wind (and Rhett Butler, Scarlett's counterpart, in Rhett Butler's People), because not only is she someone you can sympathize with, but she's someone you hate and someone you love at the same time. Another example of a book that I read recently was Ron Kovic in Born On the Fourth of July, which focuses on a Vietnam veteran's character development with PTSD.

TL;DR: It's probably not you, but rather the literature you're reading.

PS: Yeah, side characters are cool too.
  
						Last edited by BurningGrace; 06-18-2012 at 01:40 AM.
					
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Old 06-18-2012, 10:11 PM View Post #12 (Link)
Jack (Offline)
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Originally Posted by BurningGrace View Post
Harry Potter may have been The Chosen One to stop Voldemort,
umm, we prefer 'He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named'.
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Old 06-19-2012, 03:41 AM View Post #13 (Link)
BurningGrace (Offline)
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Originally Posted by Jack View Post
umm, we prefer 'He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named'.
Call him Voldemort, Jack. Fear in a name increases fear of the thing itself.
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Old 06-19-2012, 09:56 AM View Post #14 (Link)
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Originally Posted by BurningGrace View Post
Call him Voldemort, Jack. Fear in a name increases fear of the thing itself.
Until you get to book 7 and it turns out that there was a really really good reason no one ever referred to him by name (because if you said his name, people would show up and kill you). It kind of just makes Dumbledore look like a dick for telling everyone they shouldn't be worried about saying it, like they were weaker wizards for being afraid, even though THEY weren't the most powerful wizard hiding behind the most well-defended location in Britain...
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Old 06-19-2012, 02:38 PM View Post #15 (Link)
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Originally Posted by Infinity_Man View Post
Until you get to book 7 and it turns out that there was a really really good reason no one ever referred to him by name (because if you said his name, people would show up and kill you). It kind of just makes Dumbledore look like a dick for telling everyone they shouldn't be worried about saying it, like they were weaker wizards for being afraid, even though THEY weren't the most powerful wizard hiding behind the most well-defended location in Britain...
Yeah, but before book 7 you didn't have people trying to kill you every time you said his name, and that quote was from Sorcerer's Stone. I'm sure Dumbledore just didn't predict that it would happen in the future :p And I'm sure hiding in the safest locations in Britain is a good place to go when you're destroying Horcuxes owned by the second most-powerful wizard XDDD hahaha!
  
						Last edited by BurningGrace; 06-19-2012 at 02:39 PM.
					
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Old 08-13-2012, 08:47 PM View Post #16 (Link)
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In my opinion, in most books I read I usually find one side character who is deeper than pretty much everyone else, including the main character.
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Old 05-10-2013, 11:52 AM View Post #17 (Link)
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Well- I sort of agree. I think.
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Old 05-11-2013, 08:06 AM View Post #18 (Link)
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Yes, that's often true. Even in Romeo and Juliet I would say that Mercutio is the pivotal character, not Romeo or Juliet.
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